Sunday, April 29, 2012

Planting and Growing Your Own Herb Garden


After reading yesterday's post that outlined just how beneficial herbs can be for your health, you may have gotten inspired to grow and herb garden of your own.  So here are a few tips to make yours more successful.

If you have a sunny spot in your yard, you can start a little garden there.  Lay it out in any design that looks pretty to you. 

You can go big and formal and create a Celtic knot design . . .

Refer to the seed tape instructions before planting.


Small and easy care . . .



Or if you don’t have much space you could try one of these . . .





No matter which kind of herb garden you want to grow, you will be more successful if you know the type of soil and the light requirements for your herb selections and it’s also nice to know how tall they grow and how wide they spread.   So here is a handy chart I found on the “How Stuff Works” website.  For even more information you can visit http://home.howstuffworks.com/how-to-grow-an-herb-garden4.htm.


Name
Plant
Landscape
Light
Soil
Height
Spread
Culture
Angelica
B
     
FS, PS
A, M
60-72
36
E
Anise
A

FS
A, D
18-24
4-8
E
Basil
A
     
FS
R, M
18
10
E
Chervil
A

PS
A, M
18
4-8
A-D
Chives
P
     
FS, PS
A-R, M
8-12
8
E
Coriander
A

FS
R
24-36
6
E
Costmary
P

FS, PS
R
30-36
24
E
A

FS
A-S, M
24-36
6
E
P

FS
R
50-72
18-36
E
P

FS
A-P
18
8
E
P
     
FS
A-R
Varies
Varies
A
Horehound
P
     
FS
A-P
30
12
E
P, A

FS
R
8-12
12-18
E
Nasturtium
A
     
FS, PS
A-P, M
12-72
18
E
Oregano
P

FS
A-S
18
12
E
B
     
FS, PS
R, M
12
8
E
P

FS, PS
R, M
24-30
12
E, R
Rosemary
P
     
FS
S
48-72
18-24
A
Rue
P
     
FS
P, S
24
18
A
Sage
P
     
FS
S
20
24
E
Savory, Summer
A

FS
R-A
18
8
E
Sorrel, French
P

FS, PS
R, M
18
10
E
Southernwood
P
     
FS
Any
30
24
E
Spearmint
P

FS, PS
R, M
20
12
E, R
Sweet, Woodruff
P
     
S
R, M
6-8
6-8
D
P

FS, PS
A-P
40
12-18
E, R
Tarragon, French
P
     
FS, PS
S-R
24
24
A
Thyme
P
     
FS, PS
P-A
1-10
12-18
E, R
Wormwood
P
     
FS
Any
30-48
15-20
A

Herb Chart Key
Plant Life Cycle: A= Annual, B= Biennial, P= Perennial
Light Requirement: FS= Full Sun, PS= Partial Shade, S= Shade
Soil Type: P= Poor, A= Average, R= Rich, S= Sandy, M= Moist, D= Dry
Growing Habit: E= Easy to Grow, A= Average, D= Difficult, R= Rampant Grower/ Keep Restricted
(Height and Spread is in inches)


If you want to plant an intricate design, I highly recommend using seed tape.   The beauty of seed tape is that you can easily control the placement of the seeds to make certain that your herbs will actually make the design you were aiming for.  Plus many seeds are so small that it’s difficult to space them evenly.  Seed tape makes fast work of all of that.

My friend Linda was nice enough to share her directions for creating your own.  All you need is toilet paper, some paste (mix any type of flour you have in your kitchen with water to create a slurry), and seeds.

Lay a strip of the toilet paper out and place just enough slurry on so that as you place the seeds they have something to cling to.  Space the seeds according to package directions.  Fold the toilet paper in half.  If you plan to wait a few days or weeks to start planting, be sure you allow your seed tape to dry thoroughly.

Homemade Seed Tape

Now your designs will be practically effortless!

Have fun!

Dr. P

2 comments:

  1. This is the coolest tip Dr. P...I am jazzed and going out today to get myself organized and in the planting activities!

    I love the creative aspects and the beauty of the designs!

    Nancy Cragin

    ReplyDelete
  2. Write more, thats all I have to say. Literally,
    it seems as though you relied on the video to make your point.
    You definitely know what youre talking about, why throw away
    your intelligence on just posting videos to your site when
    you could be giving us something informative to read?


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    ReplyDelete