Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Roses - Adding a Little More Love to Your Life

Today's post is a bit long!  I've included the health and beauty benefits of these sweet smelling beauties as well as 3 sets of instructions to make your own floral water PLUS 2 recipes for using Rosewater in your kitchen!


As I mentioned in my post yesterday, roses are reported to have the highest vibrational frequency of all flowers, and it is the same vibration as love.  This may account for our fascination and love for these fragrant beauties . . . After all who doesn't need a little more love in their daily life?


Rose petals are actually a good source of Vitamin C, but rose hips are extremely high in Vitamin C.  For many years native peoples of all cultures used them to treat many illnesses like influenza, colds, pneumonia and intestinal infections.  They were also used as a preservative in making jerky.


Rose water is used in Middle Eastern cuisine to provide a subtle floral note.  But it must be used sparingly.  Many French patisseries use it to flavor cakes, cream fillings and icing.  


Rose oil is used in many natural perfumes and is said to have etherial qualities that make people smile when they smell it . . . like I said who couldn't use a little more love.


When it comes to skin care rose oil and rosewater are both used extensively.  Rosewater is a fantastic toner and moisturizer in one spray.  Rose oil is very effective in reducing fine lines and wrinkles, partially because the high Vitamin C content helps to rebuild collagen.


Making your own Rosewater is a simple process and depending upon the method you use will contain considerable amounts of rose oil as well.  Below you will find 3 separate methods to make your own rose or other floral waters.  




These make wonderful gifts with a tag and a bit of ribbon (hint - it's almost Mother's Day).  If you make your Rosewater in the traditional way you can also use it in cooking.  So at the bottom of the post you will also find a recipe for a delicious Sugar-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free Coconut Creme Anglaise and Ice Creme!


Here's to a little more love in your life,


Dr. P




Instructions for Making Traditional Floral Hydrosol
Making your own rose, lilac, lavender, geranium, honeysuckle, orange blossom or gardenia water is quite simple.  This technique is a traditional method that creates a distilled hydrosol that’s wonderfully fragrant.

Ingredients:
3 cups flower petals
pH 11.5 ionized water (or filtered water)
Ice

Equipment:
4 quart sauce pan with lid
1 jar lid
1 quart size plastic zipper bag
Heat-proof bowl that fits down into pan

For the most fragrant rosewater pick rose petals in the early morning while they are still dewy.  It is essential that your roses are organic and wild or old fashioned roses are best.

Place the jar lid in the center of your pot and surround with rose petals.  The bowl should sit down on the lid so that it is elevated off the bottom of the pan.  




Add enough water to cover the petals + 1 inch.  Invert lid on pot (I prefer glass lids so I can see what’s happening in the pot).  Heat water using medium-low setting until the water is steaming but not boiling. 



In the meantime, fill the zipper bag with ice.  As the steam begins to form water droplets on the lid set the bag of ice on the lid to create more condensation.  As the condensation forms water droplets they will fall into the bowl.




Continue until the water in the pan has nearly boiled dry, replacing ice as necessary.  Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.

Pour into sterilized bottle with sprayer or jars with tightly fitting lids.  I fill a small dark glass spray bottle for daily use and store the remaining floral water in the refrigerator.



Because this is a distillate, the rose water will be colorless.  It's perfect to add to lotions, bath or beauty care products, as a toner and in cooking.  When ironing I add a couple of tablespoons to my iron when I want a scented clothes.


Instructions for Simple Floral Water
This is a super simple preparation that generally contains a bit more rose oil than the traditional preparation and is much faster and easier although it does not keep quite as long.

Ingredients:
3 cups flower petals
pH 11.5 ionized water or distilled water

For the most fragrant floral water pick flower petals in the early morning while they are still dewy.  It is essential that your petals are organic.  When making rosewater wild or old fashioned roses are best.  When making geranium hydrosol be sure to use the entire bracket and the very top part of the stem.  When making lavender hydrosol use flowers, buds and leaves.

Bruise flower petals to encourage them to release their oils and fragrance.  Place in a 2 quart sauce pan and cover with water.  If using ionized water let them stand for at least 1 hour to extract more oils from the petals.

Heat water using medium-low setting until the water is steaming hot but not boiling.  Continue to heat until the flower petals have lost their color.



Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.  Strain and squeeze petals to remove all water.  I use this variety for bath/beauty/skin care but not in cooking.

Pour into sterilized bottle with sprayer or jars with tightly fitting lids.  Because this water is heated but not distilled, it will be lightly colored and it’s important to store in the refrigerator.


Instructions for Super Charged Rose Water Using Ionized Water
This is really super simple, contains more rose oil and is much higher in Vitamin C than the traditional preparation.  It can be used in cooking as well as skin/body care and makes a wonderful perfume. It does need to be stored in the refrigerator to retain it's freshness longer.

Ingredients:
3 cups flower petals
1/2 cup rose hips
pH 11.5 ionized water 

For the most fragrant floral water pick flower petals in the early morning while they are still dewy.  It is essential that your petals are organic.  When making rosewater wild or old fashioned roses are best.  When making geranium hydrosol be sure to use the entire bracket and the very top part of the stem.  When making lavender hydrosol use flowers, buds and leaves.

Place flower petals in a 1 quart jar.  Fill jar with water and let stand for 4-5 days.  The oils and fragrance will diffuse into the water and since Vitamin C is water soluble and is diminished when exposed to heat, this water will contain more Vitamin C than other preparations.

Pour into sterilized bottle with sprayer or jars with tightly fitting lids.  Because this water is neither heated or distilled, it will have a light color and it’s important to store in the refrigerator.  I use this one in cooking as well as body/skin care and as a lightly scented perfume.  




Coconut and Rose Crème Anglaise and Ice Crème
This is a smooth, creamy, sugar free and non-dairy version of a French custard sauce – it’s actually a thin pudding.  Crème Anglaise is often used as a dessert sauce but this version deserves to be the star of your dessert.  serve either warm or cold and refrigerated it will keep for several days.  Pour it over a slice of GF Pound Cake or as the base for ice crème, garnish with lightly toasted coconut and strips of fresh rose petals.
Yield - 2 Cups

1 1/2 cups Thai Kitchen Organic Lite Coconut Milk
2 eggs
1 teaspoon rose water
5 pitted dates
1 teaspoon agar powder
1 tablespoon butter or ghee

In a VitaMix or other powerful blender, blend all ingredients until dates are completely incorporated.  Pour mixture into a saucepan and cook, stirring constantly over medium-low heat until it coats the back of a spoon.  Remove from heat, pour into a bowl, cover and cool.  Use as a dessert sauce.

To make Ice Creme freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions for your ice cream freezer.  Store in a tightly covered container.



No comments:

Post a Comment